THE MAKESPACE BLOG

LET'S REDEFINE HOW WE VIEW OUR OWN CREATIVITY!

How are you Creative?

How ARE you creative: Building a strong foundation for creative engagement

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Let’s begin by thinking about the following questions:
So, what is creativity anyway?
Does everyone have creative potential?
Are some people creative and others not?
Does creativity matter in learning? In teaching? In life?

Societally, we have come to believe that only some people are capable of creativity. From this vantage, you’re either born with creative traits and talents or not. A question that might arise from that perspective would be, how creative are you?

That question suggests that creative potential exists on some linear spectrum. But there is no singular creativity metric. No low-to-high gradient. And no 0-to-100 numerical creativity scale. Creativity comes in many forms and requires a wide range of ingredients to take shape, make meaning, and affect others and the world around us.

At makeSPACE, we believe that the creative process is participatory and for everyone. And so we ask our partners to think about creativity from a different perspective.

Rather than thinking about how creative you are, we ask, instead, to think about how are you creative?

makeSPACE partners engaging their creativity at the 2019 Summer Institute.

This approach to understanding creative potential—and our capacity to produce creativity—follows the same logic proposed by Stan Kuczaj. Dr. Kuczaj, a comparative psychologist and dolphin expert, wasn’t satisfied with the narrowly standardized approach to cetacean research. He implored his fellow researchers to ask, “not how smart are dolphins, but how are dolphins smart?”

His approach to cetacean intelligence arose from a variation on the question “how smart are dolphins?” He understood that dolphin intelligence was categorically different than our human conception of intelligence. In other words, it was nonsense to study dolphin brilliance in comparison to humans.

Similarly, constricting the question of our creative potential to a monolithic container reduces the complexity of creativity. It makes creativity exclusive, and it diminishes the value of our individual differences.

We begin our work with the belief that creative potential is multidimensional. It is cultural, social, emotional, psychological, and cognitive all at once.

Read More from the makeSPACE Team

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In July 2018, poet, teacher, and author Ross Gay had an idea—what might happen if he wrote about something he found delightful as a daily practice for a whole year straight.

Billy Loves His Bees

Artcore teacher, Billy Hughes, recently created a video for the Network Charter School Showcase, a typically live celebration of school community talent and interests that has pivoted to a youtube video share in these Covidian times. It was all about his love of bees!

What is Metaphor? And why is it important?

We all know authors use metaphors to brighten up stories, but what role do they play in our everyday lives and how can we use them to convey information and open minds to new ways of thinking?​

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Meet the author

Ross Anderson

CAPOEIRA ENTHUSIAST, STUDENT OF GUITAR AND OUTDOORS EXTRAORDINAIRE!

Ross is a designer, researcher, and strategist in the education field working to harness creative potential of educators and students, alike. Ross aims to contribute solutions for equitable, engaging, and aspirational learning environments and to understand how this process unfolds. Ross practices Capoeira, an Afro-Brazilian martial art dance form, and loves to write. 

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We want young people and their teachers to be fulfilled, to feel agency, and to shape their own lives and the world around them. We want them to thrive within the possible - as the world offers them moment after moment of uncertainty.